Aland Crisis
Outline of events:
Prior to 1809, the Aland Islands were located centrally in the Swedish realm. However, in the Treaty of Fredrikshamn, signed on September 17th, Sweden had to give up all control of the islands, along with Finland, to Imperial Russia. The language and culture of the local population were hardly considered. By the Treaty of Paris of April 18th, 1856, an outcome of the Crimean War, Great Britain required Russia to withhold the construction of any new fortifications on the islands. This stipulation was obeyed, despite unsuccessful attempts to change the status of the de-militarized islands in 1908. By the First World War, however, the Russian government turned the islands into a submarine base for the use of British and Russian submarines during the war.
(GuinnTa)
Works Cited:
The, By. "Aland Crisis Swedish Islands Finland Sweden Cabinet War." Business, Economy, Market Research, Finance, Income Tax Informations. Web. 16 Oct. 2010. <http://www.economicexpert.com/a/Aland:crisis.htm>.

Central Issue of the crisis:
The demilitarization was a result of a conflict that was started in 1809 when Russia acquired the islands from the Kingdom of Sweden and started building a fortress in Bomarsund. During the Crimean War, France and Great Britain attacked and defeated the Russians and in the peace treaty the Aland Islands were declared demilitarized for the future. In the 1920's, a new conflict arose between Finland and Sweden. They began fighting over the islands, so the question on the table was who should the islands belong to? The Alanders wanted to belong to Sweden, but the question was delicate due to the internationally important location of the islands. The matter had to be decided by the newly formed League of Nations (known as the UN today) in order to secure the cultural and historical society.
(GuinnTa)
Works Cited:
"HISTORY OF ALAND." Travel Scandinavia Iceland Norway Chile Antarctica Cruises Tours Europe Vacations European River Cruises. Web. 17 Oct. 2010. <http://www.scantours.com/history_of_aland.htm>.

Role played by League of Nations in dealing with the crisis and analysis of effectiveness of League of Nations role in the event:
In 1921, the League of Nations intervened to bring an end to this conflict. The League decided that the Islands should stay under the sovereignty of Finland, with certain guarantees. Finland had to preserve Aland's swedish language, customs, culture and self-government. The Autonomy Act, between Finland and Sweden, supported this decision by ensuring Aland demilitarization, autonomy, and neutralization. The League of Nations found that this satisfied it's decision and demands. This decision was one of the more effective roles that the League of Nations played in international affairs. Although the islands wanted to become a part of Sweden at the time of this decision, more and more people are perceiving this decision as beneficial. Since Finland allowed the islands to be autonomous and demilitiarized, they were allowed to keep their culture and no longer had to be stuck between these two nations. Also, after World War II, when Sweden did not aid the islands, the Aland Islands increasingly considered themselves to be their own, autonomous part of Finland. In this way, the Aland Islands benefited from this decision, even if it was not necessarily what they wanted at the beginning.
(JonesMa)
Works Cited:
"Aland Crisis." FindTarget.com. Web. 17 Oct. 2010. <http://reference.findtarget.com/search/Åland%20crisis/>.
"The Aland Islands." The Osterholm Genealogy and Family History. Web. 18 Oct. 2010. <http://www.osterholm.info/aland/index.html>.

Primary Source Visual:
The Bomarsund Barrage
draft_lens2235604module12102074photo_1224248420772px-Sveaborg_bombed.jpg
Analysis of Document:
Bomarsund is a nineteenth century fortress in Sund on the Åland Islands in the Baltic Sea. It was built in 1832 by Russia but destroyed twenty two years later in 1854 in the Crimean War by a British-French fleet.
The Battle of Bomarsund was fought between the Russian defenses at Bomarsund and an Anglo-French task force. After a week of fighting the British stormed the "remaining" fort and at the end of the battle the fort of Bomarsund was destroyed.
Three hundred Finnish grenadiers defending the fortress were captured and imprisoned in Lewes in the United Kingdom. They were later allowed to return to Finland, and they returned with a song telling about their battle and imprisonment, called the War of Åland (Finnish: Oolannin sota). The so-called Russian Memorial was erected in Lewes in 1877 to honour those who died in captivity.
In the Treaty of Paris 1856, the entire Åland Islands were demilitarized, which is a status that has been preserved until this day.
(GuinnTa)
Works Cited:
"The Aaland Islands." Squidoo : Welcome to Squidoo. Aug.-Sept. 2010. Web. 18 Oct. 2010. <http://www.squidoo.com/aaland-lens>.

Analysis of Primary Source Textual:
This document is a copy of the minutes of the League of Nations meeting on June 27th, 1921. In this document is the agreement reached between Finland and Sweden regarding the guarantees Finland had to meet. The origin of this document is The League of Nations Official Journal. It's purpose is to report the proceedings of the June 27th League of Nations conference, which followed the June 24th decision made by the League of Nations giving Finland the Aland Islands. This document is valuable in that it gives information regarding exactly what the guarantees were that Finland promised the Aland Islands. However, it is limited as it does not share much beyond that. There is no opinion expressed or facts analyzed, it is simply the proceedings from the conference. Basically, this document states the legal agreements, but nothing beyond that.
(JonesMa)
Works Cited:
"THE ÅLAND AGREEMENT IN THE COUNCIL OF THE LEAGUE OF NATIONS." Proc. of The Seventeenth Meeting of the Council. Web. 17 Oct. 2010. <http://www.kultur.aland.fi/kulturstiftelsen/traktater/eng_fr/1921b_en.htm>.